Website links




Relevant websites.

Some of these are interactive activities, some are brief topic by topic summaries, some are online books with 100+ pages. You need to look for what you want!

Numeracy games for times tables, addition, divisionetc - practise these again and again and again until you are really good. Try "Moon Maths" at the bottom of the page!


BBC Bitesize Maths

AlgebraHelp.com

The banana hunt angles game

NCTM illuminations, including visual fractions,negative numbers, isometric drawing, dynamic paper, balance-pan equations, the factors game, the vector boats game.

WaldoMaths(interactive equation solving and standard form)

MrBarton Maths(maths revision, Youtube songs and links) + his KS3/KS4 maths notes for pupilsand Autograph applets

The Khan Academy online lessons on Mathematics (scroll down the page - there are hundreds of them).

PurpleMath(an online Maths book)

Walter Fendt's Java applets(e.g. sine, cos, tan interactive graph).

PHET simulations from the University of Colorado

DESMOS graphing calculator

Geogebra

plus.maths.org, the online Mathematics magazine.

Jon Stone's MathsHelper website and his Statistics revision sheet

This page on theJustinCraig revision course sitehas good advice on revision techniques.

revision-notes.co.uk GCSE Maths pages

CIMTresources including GCSE Maths, GCSE Statistics and A-level

TheMathematics in Engineering and Industry(MEI) site - A-level resources

MathsNetGCSE and MathsNetAlevel (a commercial site, some free stuff but for most you would need to subscribe).

Times table songs & raps

Times Tables Top Trumps cards

The JustMaths teaching resources (not free!)



from the Maths Inspiration lectures:

Kate Bellingham's website on Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths

David Achesonand his book 1089 and all that

Rob Eastaway's maths page


Totally irrelevant websites on weird, fun or desperately complicated topics that just might inspire you ("Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!", to paraphrase Shelley); mostly for Further Maths people.

Pi

The NRICH weekly challenges

Alex Bellos's web site (mental calculations), also the Flash Anzan Shiritori video (they're adding the on-screen numbers and doing a word association game at the same time)

A virtual slide rule(slide rules were the main way of doing quick calculations in the 300 years before the invention of calculators; for more accurate calculations, people looked up logarithms inlog tables). You can buy them on Ebay.


The Babylonian number system (base 60)


Geometry from the Land of the Incas

The Circle of Descartes

Dog School's Introduction to Group Theory (see Rubik cube)

If you think complex numbers are "cool" and you wonder if there's anything "beyond complex numbers", have a look atquaternions

The Algorithmic Beauty of the Trebuchet

The Martian calendar programming challenge.

Gapminder World (animated bubble chart of world development)

Factorising the Quintic

WalkingRandomly blog




Engineering, science and astronomy

The Fundamental Questions Institute FXQI Community site

How Stuff Works:


Intellectual Ventures site,shooting down mosquitoswith a laser

From Stargazers to Starships, part of David Stern's site.

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory page about magnets and electricity.

Ars Technica articles on science and technology

The Optical SETI site.

The Kuiper belt.

How do magnets work?

Fourmilab (by the founder of Autodesk):


The Skylon spaceplane project.


Honda'sself-balancing unicycle.

TheRyno electric unicycle.

Elektor has lots of fun electronics projects including:



LearnAbout-Electronics.com Hurray! This is for those of you you are going on to do Electronic Engineering. Really you need to be soldering up circuits but this is a good start.


A physicist has calculated the propagation of the WiFi signal through his flat - summary, full blog. Wow!


Interesting Youtube links

The concept of a mode shape is very valuable in the analysis and prediction of vibrations - see vibration modes of a flat plate.


Astronauts playing with a water drop. When you see craters on the Moon and they have a central bump, you know that a droplet has been ejected by the impact and fallen back…just like water drops.




RWM 2013